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#ANGELOFANYWHERE

 

about the film

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Synopsis

Angel of Anywhere is the story of an empathetic stripper who plays therapist to the many damaged clientele and co-workers who frequent the popular Anywhere Bar.

JamesWorks Entertainment’s Angel of Anywhere stars Briana Evigan (“Step Up Movie 2: The Streets,” “Sorority Row”) as Michelle, Ser'Darius Blain (“When The Game Stands Tall,” “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle”) as Brian, David A. Gregory (“One Life to Live,” “The Good Fight”) as D.C., Nihan Gur (“Westworld,” “Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders”) as Alexx in Wonderland, Krystal Conway as Bartender, and introduces Axel Roldos as Angel.

Angel of Anywhere is directed by James Kicklighter (“Desires of the Heart”), written by Casey Nelson & Kate Murdoch (“The Last Treasure Hunt Movie”) and produced by Beau Turpin (“Beneath The Leaves").

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screenings

 

January 8th, 2018:

Jaipur International Film Festival (Jaipur, India)

 

January 26th, 2018:

Irvine International Film Festival (Irvine, California)

 

February 4th, 2018:

Four Seasons Film Festival (London, England)

 

Coming Soon:

Shorts HD on DirecTV and Amazon Prime

 

REVIEWS & INTERVIEWS

 

 

Director James Kicklighter serves up another winning film with Angel of Anywhere. While you may be thinking you’re in for some shallow, pointless cinematic short you should think again. The truth is that there’s a whole lot more going on in Angel of Anywhere than you would possibly think thanks to an intelligent, insightful and meaningful script from Kate Murdoch and Casey Nelson.
It’s important to pay attention to these details in James Kicklighter’s movie, written by Kate Murdoch and Casey Nelson, as nothing is not connected, every action tied to the next and ultimately to a twist ending. Things might seem superfluous and have potential to be disregarded as filler, but that is missing the larger point of who and what Angel is and what the end reveals about his fate. It’s smart and it’s challenging. Any film that forces questions like this are worth a closer look.
There is a daring to the craft that does not let the central themes do all of the heavy lifting. Instead, the aesthetic and mise en scéne are just as integral to the movie’s power as the characters and dialogue. This can be seen in the wonderfully atmospheric backroom where the key scenes take place, with its cold blue light and sparseness, and Angel filling the room with his almost naked body. This expertly suited the emotional vulnerability of the characters who entered.
A deftly written, intelligently executed, deeply human, dramatic exploration into the very heart of what it means to have the desire to see things that are broken fixed. With a beautiful sense of itself and its purpose, the film’s perfect pacing allows us to experience a full immersion into the intricacies of the emotionally scarred individuals Angel comes into contact with, allowing him opportunity to infuse an almost otherworldly calm, idealistic, and empathetic wisdom to each. Throughout the narrative as well, both visually and verbally, whether forefront or in background, everything points to the aforementioned notions above, while the film’s setting and cinematography greatly speaks to the naked, raw vulnerability being presented as well. Plus, suffice it to say, the film’s finale puts a well earned exclamation point on the proceedings, highly evocative and richly effective in conjunction with the themes here.
A perfect example of concept, structure, and execution. [James] Kicklighter’s camera makes wonderful use of the loud and colorful club setting...backed by an incredibly talented cast, director, and writers.
Should you find yourself randomly watching this film at some point down the road, unless told by another, you would think it was produced by any one of your favorite studios. An exercise in near flawless design and execution...Angel himself, played by Axel Roldos, feels almost perfect. A real person who happened to be caught on camera for sixteen minutes. I simply can’t stress enough how excellently this production flows onscreen, from the technical to the acting.
I now wonder after seeing Angel of Anywhere if Showgirls was lying to me (what a shocker?!) because I have a feeling what happens in those VIP rooms is a lot more like what happens in Angel of Anywhere instead of in Showgirls; awkward confessions without the sexy hookup. By the time Angel of Anywhere was over, I wished I had some kind of power in Hollywood or too much extra cash hanging around so I could use it to get this short film further expanded into a feature length movie or even better, a limited series, because I see nothing but potential for all kinds of fascinating stories and characters that can come from a scenario like that.
I was impressed by all the performances. Axel Roldos is well-cast as the likable Angel. Briana Evigan, who also starred in a couple of Step Up Movie films, as well as Sorority Row and as Sonja in the From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series brings some gravitas to the production and is very strong in her performance as Michelle.
Written by Kate Murdoch and Casey Nelson, there’s a natural touch to [Angel of Anywhere’s] script with dialogue ranging from innocent to awkward, positioning the audience as a fly on the wall, listening to raw conversations that should be unheard. James Kicklighter’s stylish short film flows effortlessly and boasts a committed cast who, in a mere 16 minutes, is able to bring depth to their roles. Angel of Anywhere is a taut examination of human insecurities, with a sprinkle of the supernatural.
Let me just preface this story by saying that [making Angel of Anywhere] was a scary ass proposition...I was determined to make this happen so I can show ‘Hollywood’ that I was serious about [being an actor].